Friday, May 12, 2006

Nimesulide fights breast cancer by targeting key enzyme

A pain–killing medication appears to halt the production of an enzyme that is key to a common form of breast cancer, a new study using tissue cultures suggests. The drug is called nimesulide. In laboratory experiments on breast cancer cells, scientists found that derivatives of nimesulide stopped the production of aromatase, the enzyme implicated in estrogen-dependent breast cancer. This form of breast cancer is the most common kind of breast cancer in postmenopausal women. Aromatase converts hormones called androgens into estrogens. While many women with estrogen-dependent breast cancer take aromatase inhibitors to control their disease, the problem is that the current inhibitor drugs halt estrogen production throughout the body...That means that other tissues, like bone and brain, which rely on normal aromatase production, may suffer. For one, we think that aromatase helps to maintain bone tissue throughout the postmenopausal period. Current aromatase inhibitors may disturb normal bone production – there is some suggestion that these drugs may increase the risk of fractures. The study's results suggest that nimesulide may block aromatase production only in breast tissue. --Click the title of this post to read the full article from its source--

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